Kentucky Air National Guard, Security Forces Airmen train for combat scenarios

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123 Security Forces Squadron personnel apprehend an simulated opposing force actor during a training exercise, at Wendell H. Ford Regional Training Center in Greenville, Ky. on Sept. 18, 2014. The SFS conducted a week-long training course for combat skills training and to prepare for future deployments. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Phil Speck)

By Master Sgt. Phil Speck, 123rd Airlift Wing Public Affairs Office

Wendell H. Ford Regional Training Center, Greenville, Ky.– Airmen from the Kentucky Air National Guard’s 123d Security Forces Squadron participated in field training on September 15-19 at WHFRTC. This training was designed to help prepare young Airmen and non-commissioned officers for future deployments.

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Staff Sgt. Kyle Clark, security forces craftsman for the 123rd Security Forces Squadron, teaches a security tactics class during a training exercise, at Wendell H. Ford Regional Training Center in Greenville, Ky. on Sept. 17, 2014. The 123rd SFS conducted a week-long training course for combat skills training and to prepare for future deployments. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Phil Speck)

This bi-annual training event began on base in the classroom the week prior. The week-long training was kicked off by an aviation insertion via a Kentucky Army National Guard UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter. From there they set up a perimeter, completed a 2 mile patrol, and assaulted a village to rescue two prisoners of war, and this was just the first few hours of the training. They also trained on land navigation, night training patrols, and ended with a field training exercise (FTX). The FTX was designed to simulate air base defense and mounted patrols in a combat environment. According to Lt. Col. George Imorde, commander of the 123d Security Forces Squadron, the training couldn’t have come at a better time.

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123 Security Forces Squadron personnel conduct a mounted patrol during a training exercise, at Wendell H. Ford Regional Training Center in Greenville, Ky. on Sept. 17, 2014. The SFS conducted a week-long training course for combat skills training and to prepare for future deployments. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Phil Speck)

“The Security Forces AFSC (Air Force Specialty Code) training gained through the field training exercise enhanced our rapid deployment ability to support the 123d Contingency Response Group deployment in support of Operation United Assistance. The realistic Base Defense/Force Protection training conducted at WHFRTC provided a refresher of the duties and expectations placed upon the Security Forces career field directly related to our combat mission,” Imorde added.
Unfortunately, the Airmen are unable to receive this type of enhanced training at home station. For most people, Security Forces are the first person they see as coming onto an Air Force base. A common misconception by many is Security Forces only guard the gates, secure the flight line and patrol the base. But according to Tech. Sgt. Craig Davis, Combat Arms NCOIC for the 123d SFS, this is just a small portion of what they do.

“The bigger picture of what we do is the defense/protection of air bases in deployed environments. The methodology of completing those tasks is really our primary mission. We place a lot of emphasis on home station defense and not nearly enough on air base defense. When we deploy, these Airmen and NCOs are expected to know air base defense,” Davis said.

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Tech. Sgt. Amanda Bedel, a food specialist for the 123rd Force Support Squadron, serves breakfast to Tech. Sgt George Whelan, a combat arms instructor for the 123rd Security Forces Squadron, at Wendell H. Ford Regional Training Center in Greenville, Ky. on Sept. 17, 2014. The Kentucky Air National Guard’s FSS fixed meals for the SFS members during a week-long field training course. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Phil Speck)

For some members of SFS, this was the first time leading in this type of environment as new NCOs. Training new Airmen and preparing them for deployments is a very rewarding task Davis said.

“Letting young Airmen see what we do, and how we do it. Seeing young NCOs become seasoned NCOs and take charge bringing teams together. Everyone is an individual, when you come together and work towards a common goal as a team it is pretty rewarding. When they are no longer looking to you for instruction and they are looking to each other for approval, then you know the training has been successful,” Davis said.

Members from the Wing’s 123rd Force Support Squadron went on the training exercise as well to feed the troops. They brought their DRMKT (Disaster Relief Mobile Kitchen Trailer) and prepared hot meals for the Airmen as they trained.

 

 

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