ADT 5 awards Family Readiness Group leader

Story by Staff Sgt. Sidney Hoffmann, ADT 5 Unit Public Affairs Historian Representative

131214-037

Col. Bob Hayter, commander of Kentucky’s Agribusiness Development Team 5 presents Ginger Munden the Family Readiness Award during the unit’s Yellow Ribbon Program in Louisville, Ky., Dec. 14, 2013. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Sidney Hoffmann)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Just like the Soldiers and Airmen in the Kentucky National Guard, a Family Readiness Group is a unit.  The FRG’s mission is to provide support not only to the deploying troops, but unto themselves.  Families unite together for meetings and workshops that focus on addressing stress, issues regarding finances or children, or just coming together to talk about the good things and make morale packages for the Soldiers.

Ginger Munden served as the Family Readiness Group leader for Kentucky’s Agribusiness Development Team 5 during the unit’s deployment to Afghanistan in 2012-2013. ADT 5’s leadership presented her with the Family Readiness Award during the unit’s Yellow Ribbon ceremony, Dec. 15, 2013.

Members of the unit returned home in September, but due to logistical issues the Soldiers and Airmen arrived at different times and locations. The scattered return didn’t detract from the families awaiting them at the gates of the airports.

MSG Gwinn

Master Sgt. Connie Gwinn is greeted by her grandchildren at Louisville International Airport upon her return home from Afghanistan, Sept. 6, 2013. Members of Kentucky’s Agribusiness Development Team 5 spent nearly a year in Afghanistan and is the last scheduled ADT for the Kentucky Guard(U.S. Army National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Sidney Hoffmann)

“It feels good to know I have such an amazingly supportive family.  I was proud of being a part of a great team, but I am definitely glad to be home now,” said Master Sgt. Connie Gwinn, who was met with an entourage of family members.

Supportive families have said to be the key to a successful deployment for military units and Munden wanted just that for the men, women and families of ADT 5 in running the FRG

“FRG teaches families they are not alone and are aware of the benefits available, share in frustrations and life changes, and group events like Red Cross training,” she said. “It was a great experience, and I could not have done it without the support and help of the Service members’ families.”

Col. Bob Hayter and Lt. Col. Dallas F. Kratzer presented Ginger with an etched glass memento containing the iconic National Guard minuteman figure.

Hayter praised the efforts of Ginger and the families by saying, “The FRG was the full-time connection to home.  With the morale packages the FRG team had put together, it made the deployment more manageable and served as a reminder we were well thought of in our absence.”

Other family members were recognized as well for their efforts and participation in events such as Ralene Kratzer, Heather Steele and their three children, and Lynn and Sarah Fox.

Unfortunately, Sgt. Maj. Munden was away for training in Texas for his newly acquired position with the Wounded Warrior Transition Unit at Fort Knox.  However, the ceremony was ended with his signature slow but strong clap by the entire unit, noting the profound respect the team had for him and his wife, Ginger.

ADT 5 was a joint operation consisting of both Air and Army National Guard members.  During the nine months they were able to rebuild relationships between the people and their government by implementing programs such as the Youth Agriculture program and strengthened the current veterinary services.  Among those programs, local farmers increased their management and marketing skills to be able to bring in more money for their community.

“Our team members served with honor, discipline, and integrity,” said Sgt. Maj. Munden prior to the ceremony. “Their performance was outstanding and their efforts brought hope to the people of Afghanistan.  I am very proud to have been a member of this team.”

About kentuckyguard