Warrant officer an expert in his musical field

Story by Spc. Brandy Mort, 133rd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment

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With Chief Warrant Officer Greg Stepp at the helm, the Kentucky National Guard’s 202nd Army Band performs during a local concert in Lincoln Co. Ky. July 9. The 202nd will hold concerts across the state of Kentucky during this year’s annual training. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Spc. Brandy Mort)

July has been declared Kentucky National Guard Warrant Officer Month in a proclamation by Gov. Steve Beshear.  This is one of a series of articles we are publishing in celebration of the warrant officer corps.  Click here to read more about 95th birthday of the Army’s warrant officer corps.

STANFORD, Ky. —  Following WWII and reorganization of the National Guard, one of the first units established was the 202nd Army Band, whose commander would be, and continues to be, a warrant officer.

Chief Warrant Officer Greg Stepp, Commander and Band Master with the 202nd Army Band has, and continues to, lead the band as have those before him.

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“I only work with a handful of Soldiers,” said Stepp, “But they are all trained on different instruments. Being able to be their leader makes me proud.”

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Chief Warrant Officer Greg Stepp, conducts the 202nd Army Band during a concert performed in Lincoln Co. Ky. July 9. Stepp has been the 202nd’s Band Master his whole military career. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Spc. Brandy Mort)

Warrant officers are specialized in one specific field of work, such as band master, where commissioned officers can hold many hats as a commander of various units.

“The great thing about being a warrant officer is being able to provide leadership to our Soldiers,” said Stepp, “I am able to share my technical skills, as well as, mentor very closely to each individual Soldier.

Stepp believes that being a warrant officer is one of the most rewarding experiences he’s had in life and in his military career. He is especially proud of being able to be a band master.

“I’ve heard military and civilian bands before,” said Stepp, “But I had only heard the 202nd play twice. However, twice was enough for me. The opportunity to be band master presented itself and I happily accepted the position.”

In his spare time, Stepp loves spending time with his family, wife, Lorri and two sons, Aaron and Nathan. He and his wife like to spend time gardening or traveling locally to see historical venues.

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