Kentucky Guardsmen assist to secure World Equestrian Games

MJO

By Spc. Scott Raper, 133rd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment

 
 

Spc. David Holmberg of the 2/138th and Trooper Daniel Armstrong of Post 8 of the Kentucky State Police provide static security at the World Equestrian Games held in Lexington, Ky., Oct. 6. Members of the Kentucky National Guard joined with local law enforcement to ensure safety and security of the international event held at the Kentucky Horse Park.

LEXINGTON, Ky. (October 14, 2010) – The Kentucky National Guard, in a joint operation with Central Kentucky law enforcement, public safety and emergency management agencies  were behind the scenes Sept. 27 through Oct. 11,  tasked with the mission of ensuring each day of the World Equestrian Games was a safe and enjoyable one for all spectators.

“Everyone worked very well together,” said Trooper Brandon Curlis, Post 7 Kentucky State Police. 

“There was good coordination between everyone, being where they need to be and doing the job they need to do,” he said.

The lifeline for all coordination at the event was the Kentucky National Guard Mobile Command Operations Center. Tucked away outside from spectators view, the seamless plan of coverage between the local and state agencies was brought to life inside.

Not a moment was uncovered during the 24-hour plan which included three shifts each day to provide ample security to the approximate 500,000 spectators who attended the first WEG held in the United States.

Sgt. Adam R. Zuniga from HHB 2/138th Field Artillery Battery stands at his designated security checkpoint at the World Equestrian Games in Lexington, Ky., Oct. 7. Members of the Kentucky National Guard joined with local law enforcement to provide security at the international event held at the Kentucky Horse Park.

Roughly 80 Kentucky Guardsmen, the majority from the 2nd Battalion, 138th Field Artillery Brigade, conducted the 360 degree security needed for the event.  The Citizen-Soldiers occupied 12 check points throughout the park, maintained traffic flow and patrolled the property lines that border the park.

“It’s great to see different departments bouncing ideas off each other and using their operational similarities towards the same goal,” said 1st Lt. Daniel Van Horn, Kentucky National Guard liaison officer.

“The National Guard presence signifies that this is not just a small affair.  When visitors see us, there is a new level of deterrence.”

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