military history Archive

  • By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard January 8, 2019, marks the 204th Anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans, considered by many as the last battle of the War of 1812.  Though never becoming a Federal holiday, the eighth of January, was for many years celebrated across the country, with commemorations and firing of salutes in honor of the great American victory over the British. On October 14, 1814, Kentucky Governor Isaac Shelby issued a call for men to join Gen. Andrew Jackson’s command for the New Orleans campaign, and under that call three regiments of Kentucky Detached Militia were […]

    The legend of Kentucky’s lone marksman at the Battle of New Orleans

    By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard January 8, 2019, marks the 204th Anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans, considered by many as the last battle of the War of 1812.  Though never becoming a Federal holiday, the eighth of January, was for many years celebrated across the country, with commemorations and firing of salutes in honor of the great American victory over the British. On October 14, 1814, Kentucky Governor Isaac Shelby issued a call for men to join Gen. Andrew Jackson’s command for the New Orleans campaign, and under that call three regiments of Kentucky Detached Militia were […]

    Continue Reading...

  • Kentucky National Guard Staff Report 2019 is upon us and we have a lot to be thankful for from 2018. Thank you goes out to all our Guardsmen and their families for accepting the missions and allowing us to do our jobs, and to our partner agencies across the commonwealth for the great collaborations benefiting Kentucky and the nation. Here’s a few of the most popular highlights of the past 12 months. Sgt. Jordy Brewer named National Guard NCO of the Year Selfless Service drives Soldiers to heroic rescue 123rd Airlift Wing earns 17th Air Force Outstanding Unit award Kentucky Guardsmen respond […]

    Memorable moments from 2018

    Kentucky National Guard Staff Report 2019 is upon us and we have a lot to be thankful for from 2018. Thank you goes out to all our Guardsmen and their families for accepting the missions and allowing us to do our jobs, and to our partner agencies across the commonwealth for the great collaborations benefiting Kentucky and the nation. Here’s a few of the most popular highlights of the past 12 months. Sgt. Jordy Brewer named National Guard NCO of the Year Selfless Service drives Soldiers to heroic rescue 123rd Airlift Wing earns 17th Air Force Outstanding Unit award Kentucky Guardsmen respond […]

    Continue Reading...

  • By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard With the ending of the First World War, the steel industry in the United States found itself with an excessive production capability in personnel and a reduced market.  Steel factories faced fierce competition as the national requirement for steel and steel products plummeted in the early 1920’s.  The Andrews rolling mills at Newport, Kentucky was one of the factories that felt the financial pressures and decided to reduce the hourly pay of its employees as well as organizing the plant as an open shop, where workers did not have to join a union. Negotiations […]

    Local hostilities, martial law lead to creation of state police

    By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard With the ending of the First World War, the steel industry in the United States found itself with an excessive production capability in personnel and a reduced market.  Steel factories faced fierce competition as the national requirement for steel and steel products plummeted in the early 1920’s.  The Andrews rolling mills at Newport, Kentucky was one of the factories that felt the financial pressures and decided to reduce the hourly pay of its employees as well as organizing the plant as an open shop, where workers did not have to join a union. Negotiations […]

    Continue Reading...

  • By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard Recent generations have forgotten or possibly never heard of Armistice Day and its significance to American and world history.  How many have heard or understood the meaning of the immortal words, “the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month?”  Eleven A.M. on November 11, 1918 marked the signing of the armistice between the Allied Nations and Germany, at Compiegne, France, ending hostilities on the Western Front of the First World War.   This day would become a national holiday in the United States as well as many of the Allied Nations. Today, […]

    11-11-11, 100 years later

    By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard Recent generations have forgotten or possibly never heard of Armistice Day and its significance to American and world history.  How many have heard or understood the meaning of the immortal words, “the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month?”  Eleven A.M. on November 11, 1918 marked the signing of the armistice between the Allied Nations and Germany, at Compiegne, France, ending hostilities on the Western Front of the First World War.   This day would become a national holiday in the United States as well as many of the Allied Nations. Today, […]

    Continue Reading...

  • By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard On June 1, 1792, Kentucky was admitted as the 15th State of the Union.  With the possibility of Indian attack still a reality on the frontier, Governor Isaac Shelby established the Kentucky Militia June 20.  These first Kentucky Militiamen were soon in action protecting the commonwealth from the perceived Indian threat.  Many of those serving in the newly organized Kentucky Militia, had seen much service in Indian warfare as Virginia Militiamen. Soon after Kentucky statehood Maj. John Adair and his command were called into service to escort provisions sent from Fort Washington (now Cincinnati, […]

    Adair’s defeat, Kentucky National Guard’s first battle casualties

    By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard On June 1, 1792, Kentucky was admitted as the 15th State of the Union.  With the possibility of Indian attack still a reality on the frontier, Governor Isaac Shelby established the Kentucky Militia June 20.  These first Kentucky Militiamen were soon in action protecting the commonwealth from the perceived Indian threat.  Many of those serving in the newly organized Kentucky Militia, had seen much service in Indian warfare as Virginia Militiamen. Soon after Kentucky statehood Maj. John Adair and his command were called into service to escort provisions sent from Fort Washington (now Cincinnati, […]

    Continue Reading...

  • By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard In mid-1961, relations between the United States and the Soviet Union reached a crisis over the status of the city of Berlin, Germany.  The divided city, under the joint control of the four allied powers of World War II — France, the United States, Britain, and the Soviet Union — symbolized opposing Cold War ideologies.  Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev was alarmed by the flight to freedom of nearly 300,000 East Germans per year to West Berlin.  His threat to unilaterally alter the status of Berlin was rejected by President John F. Kennedy at the […]

    The long summer camp of the Berlin Crisis

    By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard In mid-1961, relations between the United States and the Soviet Union reached a crisis over the status of the city of Berlin, Germany.  The divided city, under the joint control of the four allied powers of World War II — France, the United States, Britain, and the Soviet Union — symbolized opposing Cold War ideologies.  Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev was alarmed by the flight to freedom of nearly 300,000 East Germans per year to West Berlin.  His threat to unilaterally alter the status of Berlin was rejected by President John F. Kennedy at the […]

    Continue Reading...

  • By Staff Sgt. Benjamin Crane, 133rd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment FRANKFORT, Ky. – Honoring the Soldiers who paid the ultimate sacrifice is the best way to ensure their devotion to the country will never be forgotten. For one retired National Guardsman, James Walter Yount Jr., this charge to honor those in his family who have made this sacrifice is a duty he takes very seriously. He is also dedicated to remembering his grandfather who served in World War 1. “That monument in Frankfort has been touched by so many hands of the Yount family, it means a lot to me,” […]

    Honoring the fallen a family tradition for Guardsman

    By Staff Sgt. Benjamin Crane, 133rd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment FRANKFORT, Ky. – Honoring the Soldiers who paid the ultimate sacrifice is the best way to ensure their devotion to the country will never be forgotten. For one retired National Guardsman, James Walter Yount Jr., this charge to honor those in his family who have made this sacrifice is a duty he takes very seriously. He is also dedicated to remembering his grandfather who served in World War 1. “That monument in Frankfort has been touched by so many hands of the Yount family, it means a lot to me,” […]

    Continue Reading...

  • By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard The Kentucky National Guard’s highest state decoration is the Medal for Valor, which may be awarded to a member of the Kentucky National Guard who has distinguished himself/herself conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his/her life above and beyond the call of duty while in the service of the State and/or United States.  Additionally, it must have involved personal risk of life or a performance of more than ordinarily hazardous service, the omission of which would not justly subject the person to censure for shortcoming or failure in the performance of […]

    The first recipients of the Kentucky Medal for Valor

    By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard The Kentucky National Guard’s highest state decoration is the Medal for Valor, which may be awarded to a member of the Kentucky National Guard who has distinguished himself/herself conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his/her life above and beyond the call of duty while in the service of the State and/or United States.  Additionally, it must have involved personal risk of life or a performance of more than ordinarily hazardous service, the omission of which would not justly subject the person to censure for shortcoming or failure in the performance of […]

    Continue Reading...

  • By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard FRANKFORT, Ky. — Following their service as part of the Kentucky Brigade on the Mexican Border, Company M, Second Kentucky Infantry Regiment returned home to Beattyville, Kentucky, in February 1917. With the approaching entrance of the United States in the World War which was raging in Europe, military activities increased in the commonwealth. Kentucky National Guard units across the state were busily recruiting their commands to war strength. Simultaneously, units were being ordered to guard duty at various points in the state to secure vital pieces of infrastructure for fear of sabotage from German […]

    Century-old photo highlights Kentucky Guardsmen in WWI

    By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard FRANKFORT, Ky. — Following their service as part of the Kentucky Brigade on the Mexican Border, Company M, Second Kentucky Infantry Regiment returned home to Beattyville, Kentucky, in February 1917. With the approaching entrance of the United States in the World War which was raging in Europe, military activities increased in the commonwealth. Kentucky National Guard units across the state were busily recruiting their commands to war strength. Simultaneously, units were being ordered to guard duty at various points in the state to secure vital pieces of infrastructure for fear of sabotage from German […]

    Continue Reading...

  • By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard The mysterious explosion and sinking of the U.S. battleship, Maine, in Havana harbor Feb. 15, 1898, was the call to war with Spain for most Americans, their rallying cry was “Remember the Maine.” Amid a tidal wave of martial spirit sweeping the country, war was declared against Spain April 21. For many Kentuckians this war was an opportunity to seek retributive justice for past atrocities of the Spanish against Kentuckians during the ill-fated Lopez Expeditions to Cuba 40 years earlier, their battle cry was “Remember Crittenden.” The following article appeared in the April 24, […]

    “Remember Crittenden” battle cry for Kentuckians in Spanish American War

    By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard The mysterious explosion and sinking of the U.S. battleship, Maine, in Havana harbor Feb. 15, 1898, was the call to war with Spain for most Americans, their rallying cry was “Remember the Maine.” Amid a tidal wave of martial spirit sweeping the country, war was declared against Spain April 21. For many Kentuckians this war was an opportunity to seek retributive justice for past atrocities of the Spanish against Kentuckians during the ill-fated Lopez Expeditions to Cuba 40 years earlier, their battle cry was “Remember Crittenden.” The following article appeared in the April 24, […]

    Continue Reading...