military history Archive

  • By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard Recent generations have forgotten or possibly never heard of Armistice Day and its significance to American and world history.  How many have heard or understood the meaning of the immortal words, “the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month?”  Eleven A.M. on November 11, 1918 marked the signing of the armistice between the Allied Nations and Germany, at Compiegne, France, ending hostilities on the Western Front of the First World War.   This day would become a national holiday in the United States as well as many of the Allied Nations. Today, […]

    11-11-11, 100 years later

    By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard Recent generations have forgotten or possibly never heard of Armistice Day and its significance to American and world history.  How many have heard or understood the meaning of the immortal words, “the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month?”  Eleven A.M. on November 11, 1918 marked the signing of the armistice between the Allied Nations and Germany, at Compiegne, France, ending hostilities on the Western Front of the First World War.   This day would become a national holiday in the United States as well as many of the Allied Nations. Today, […]

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  • By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard On June 1, 1792, Kentucky was admitted as the 15th State of the Union.  With the possibility of Indian attack still a reality on the frontier, Governor Isaac Shelby established the Kentucky Militia June 20.  These first Kentucky Militiamen were soon in action protecting the commonwealth from the perceived Indian threat.  Many of those serving in the newly organized Kentucky Militia, had seen much service in Indian warfare as Virginia Militiamen. Soon after Kentucky statehood Maj. John Adair and his command were called into service to escort provisions sent from Fort Washington (now Cincinnati, […]

    Adair’s defeat, Kentucky National Guard’s first battle casualties

    By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard On June 1, 1792, Kentucky was admitted as the 15th State of the Union.  With the possibility of Indian attack still a reality on the frontier, Governor Isaac Shelby established the Kentucky Militia June 20.  These first Kentucky Militiamen were soon in action protecting the commonwealth from the perceived Indian threat.  Many of those serving in the newly organized Kentucky Militia, had seen much service in Indian warfare as Virginia Militiamen. Soon after Kentucky statehood Maj. John Adair and his command were called into service to escort provisions sent from Fort Washington (now Cincinnati, […]

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  • By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard In mid-1961, relations between the United States and the Soviet Union reached a crisis over the status of the city of Berlin, Germany.  The divided city, under the joint control of the four allied powers of World War II — France, the United States, Britain, and the Soviet Union — symbolized opposing Cold War ideologies.  Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev was alarmed by the flight to freedom of nearly 300,000 East Germans per year to West Berlin.  His threat to unilaterally alter the status of Berlin was rejected by President John F. Kennedy at the […]

    The long summer camp of the Berlin Crisis

    By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard In mid-1961, relations between the United States and the Soviet Union reached a crisis over the status of the city of Berlin, Germany.  The divided city, under the joint control of the four allied powers of World War II — France, the United States, Britain, and the Soviet Union — symbolized opposing Cold War ideologies.  Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev was alarmed by the flight to freedom of nearly 300,000 East Germans per year to West Berlin.  His threat to unilaterally alter the status of Berlin was rejected by President John F. Kennedy at the […]

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  • By Staff Sgt. Benjamin Crane, 133rd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment FRANKFORT, Ky. – Honoring the Soldiers who paid the ultimate sacrifice is the best way to ensure their devotion to the country will never be forgotten. For one retired National Guardsman, James Walter Yount Jr., this charge to honor those in his family who have made this sacrifice is a duty he takes very seriously. He is also dedicated to remembering his grandfather who served in World War 1. “That monument in Frankfort has been touched by so many hands of the Yount family, it means a lot to me,” […]

    Honoring the fallen a family tradition for Guardsman

    By Staff Sgt. Benjamin Crane, 133rd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment FRANKFORT, Ky. – Honoring the Soldiers who paid the ultimate sacrifice is the best way to ensure their devotion to the country will never be forgotten. For one retired National Guardsman, James Walter Yount Jr., this charge to honor those in his family who have made this sacrifice is a duty he takes very seriously. He is also dedicated to remembering his grandfather who served in World War 1. “That monument in Frankfort has been touched by so many hands of the Yount family, it means a lot to me,” […]

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  • By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard The Kentucky National Guard’s highest state decoration is the Medal for Valor, which may be awarded to a member of the Kentucky National Guard who has distinguished himself/herself conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his/her life above and beyond the call of duty while in the service of the State and/or United States.  Additionally, it must have involved personal risk of life or a performance of more than ordinarily hazardous service, the omission of which would not justly subject the person to censure for shortcoming or failure in the performance of […]

    The first recipients of the Kentucky Medal for Valor

    By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard The Kentucky National Guard’s highest state decoration is the Medal for Valor, which may be awarded to a member of the Kentucky National Guard who has distinguished himself/herself conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his/her life above and beyond the call of duty while in the service of the State and/or United States.  Additionally, it must have involved personal risk of life or a performance of more than ordinarily hazardous service, the omission of which would not justly subject the person to censure for shortcoming or failure in the performance of […]

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  • By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard FRANKFORT, Ky. — Following their service as part of the Kentucky Brigade on the Mexican Border, Company M, Second Kentucky Infantry Regiment returned home to Beattyville, Kentucky, in February 1917. With the approaching entrance of the United States in the World War which was raging in Europe, military activities increased in the commonwealth. Kentucky National Guard units across the state were busily recruiting their commands to war strength. Simultaneously, units were being ordered to guard duty at various points in the state to secure vital pieces of infrastructure for fear of sabotage from German […]

    Century-old photo highlights Kentucky Guardsmen in WWI

    By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard FRANKFORT, Ky. — Following their service as part of the Kentucky Brigade on the Mexican Border, Company M, Second Kentucky Infantry Regiment returned home to Beattyville, Kentucky, in February 1917. With the approaching entrance of the United States in the World War which was raging in Europe, military activities increased in the commonwealth. Kentucky National Guard units across the state were busily recruiting their commands to war strength. Simultaneously, units were being ordered to guard duty at various points in the state to secure vital pieces of infrastructure for fear of sabotage from German […]

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  • By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard The mysterious explosion and sinking of the U.S. battleship, Maine, in Havana harbor Feb. 15, 1898, was the call to war with Spain for most Americans, their rallying cry was “Remember the Maine.” Amid a tidal wave of martial spirit sweeping the country, war was declared against Spain April 21. For many Kentuckians this war was an opportunity to seek retributive justice for past atrocities of the Spanish against Kentuckians during the ill-fated Lopez Expeditions to Cuba 40 years earlier, their battle cry was “Remember Crittenden.” The following article appeared in the April 24, […]

    “Remember Crittenden” battle cry for Kentuckians in Spanish American War

    By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard The mysterious explosion and sinking of the U.S. battleship, Maine, in Havana harbor Feb. 15, 1898, was the call to war with Spain for most Americans, their rallying cry was “Remember the Maine.” Amid a tidal wave of martial spirit sweeping the country, war was declared against Spain April 21. For many Kentuckians this war was an opportunity to seek retributive justice for past atrocities of the Spanish against Kentuckians during the ill-fated Lopez Expeditions to Cuba 40 years earlier, their battle cry was “Remember Crittenden.” The following article appeared in the April 24, […]

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  • By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard The Utah Expedition, known also as the Utah War, Utah Campaign, Buchanan’s Blunder, the Mormon War and Mormon Rebellion, was an armed political, economic, military and religious confrontation between Mormon settlers in the Utah Territory and the U. S. Military, in 1857 – 1858. On June 29, 1857, President James Buchanan declared Utah in a state of rebellion against the United States, and mobilized a regiment of the U.S. Army, to act as an escort for new federal officials’ move to Utah and to establish order and enforce the laws of the United States. […]

    Kentuckians help avoid war in Utah

    By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard The Utah Expedition, known also as the Utah War, Utah Campaign, Buchanan’s Blunder, the Mormon War and Mormon Rebellion, was an armed political, economic, military and religious confrontation between Mormon settlers in the Utah Territory and the U. S. Military, in 1857 – 1858. On June 29, 1857, President James Buchanan declared Utah in a state of rebellion against the United States, and mobilized a regiment of the U.S. Army, to act as an escort for new federal officials’ move to Utah and to establish order and enforce the laws of the United States. […]

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  • Commentary by Chief Warrant Officer Joseph P. Lyddane, 138th Field Artillery Brigade FRANKFORT, Ky. — The transcontinental railroad was completed on May 10, 1869 by Chinese immigrants and twenty-six years before that, on May 7, 1843 the first Japanese people began migrating to the United States. These are but two of the many reasons why the month of May was chosen to take the opportunity to recognize the contributions made by Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs). They represent almost fifty countries with more than one hundred languages and dialects. According to the Census Bureau, there are 16.6 million AAPIs […]

    May is Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month

    Commentary by Chief Warrant Officer Joseph P. Lyddane, 138th Field Artillery Brigade FRANKFORT, Ky. — The transcontinental railroad was completed on May 10, 1869 by Chinese immigrants and twenty-six years before that, on May 7, 1843 the first Japanese people began migrating to the United States. These are but two of the many reasons why the month of May was chosen to take the opportunity to recognize the contributions made by Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs). They represent almost fifty countries with more than one hundred languages and dialects. According to the Census Bureau, there are 16.6 million AAPIs […]

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  • Story by John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard Command Historian In recognition of March as Women’s Month, kentuckyguard.com is publishing a series of articles honoring women who are significant figures in Kentucky’s military history.  The following is one such story …. FRANKFORT, Ky. —  Margaret Willie Arvin was born on April 21, 1879, the oldest of seven children of William and Bettie Arvin, of Henderson, Kentucky.  Not much is known about her early years.  In 1904, she graduated from the School of Nursing at the Owensboro City Hospital in Owensboro, Kentucky. In 1914, she is accepted as a member of the […]

    An Angel of Mercy Under Fire: Kentucky’s Most Decorated First World War Female Veteran

    Story by John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard Command Historian In recognition of March as Women’s Month, kentuckyguard.com is publishing a series of articles honoring women who are significant figures in Kentucky’s military history.  The following is one such story …. FRANKFORT, Ky. —  Margaret Willie Arvin was born on April 21, 1879, the oldest of seven children of William and Bettie Arvin, of Henderson, Kentucky.  Not much is known about her early years.  In 1904, she graduated from the School of Nursing at the Owensboro City Hospital in Owensboro, Kentucky. In 1914, she is accepted as a member of the […]

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